Consumers May Associate Added Benefits with Kosher Certification

In order for a product to be certified kosher all the ingredients used in its development must be kosher, which can make the process of certifying products quite complicated

The kosher food market is expanding to accommodate changing consumer preferences.[1]  “Over the past several years, sales of Kosher certified products have grown at an annual rate of 15%. In fact, ‘Kosher’ was the most frequently used claim on new products launched in the US,” observes SGS, a global inspection, verification, testing and certification company.[2]  Furthermore, “it is estimated that nearly 80% of all kosher food sales are sold outside of the traditional Jewish market,” reports Food Business News.[3]

It may not be surprising that some consumers who do not keep kosher as part of Jewish practices also view kosher certification positively, as it reassures them that high standards of cleanliness, purity and quality have been met.[4] The upsurge in kosher certification is due in part to shoppers seeking consumer friendly ingredient labels, vegan and allergen-free foods, and also consumer perception associating kosher certification with other issues such as, health, food safety, taste, vegetarianism, and lactose intolerance.[5]

In order for a product to be certified kosher all the ingredients used in its development must be kosher, which can make the process of certifying products quite complicated since food processors may use hundreds of different ingredients in their portfolios of products.[6] If some of a manufacturer’s ingredient suppliers lack adequate kosher supervision, in order for their final product to be kosher certified, the manufacturer must either require the supplier to become kosher or be forced to find a different supplier that is kosher. “Each time another manufacturer becomes kosher, the demand for additional kosher supervision is created and the kosher food market expands,” explains Food Business News.[7]

Cargill Salt’s kosher certified food grade products are in compliance with the complex, strict policy of kosher food laws, which include cleanliness, purity and quality.  All of Cargill’s salt food products are kosher certified, except those containing iodine, which are not kosher for Passover.

Back to Top

Sources/Legal

[1] Berry, Donna. “The trends fueling kosher certification.” 7 Mar 2017. Sosland Publishing Co. Accessed on 4 Apr 2017. Retrieved from http://www.foodbusinessnews.net/articles/news_home/Consumer_Trends/2017/03/The_trends_fueling_kosher_cert.aspx?ID={89A9C89D-D5E5-4CB1-9D49-4259A02AB9B5}

[2] SGS. Abstract/background from webinar titled, “Kosher Certification: Trends, Challenges and Opportunities.” 26 Sept 2016. Accessed on 4 Apr 2017. Retrieved from http://www.sgs.com/en/events/2016/09/kosher-certification-trends-challenges-and-opportunities?dc=http&lb=

[3] Berry, Donna.

[4] Berry, Donna.

[5] Berry, Donna.

[6] Berry, Donna.

[7] Berry, Donna.